Articles | Volume 371
https://doi.org/10.5194/piahs-371-99-2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/piahs-371-99-2015
12 Jun 2015
 | 12 Jun 2015

Wind effects on leaf transpiration challenge the concept of "potential evaporation"

S. J. Schymanski and D. Or

Viewed

Total article views: 4,008 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
1,673 2,176 159 4,008 129 131
  • HTML: 1,673
  • PDF: 2,176
  • XML: 159
  • Total: 4,008
  • BibTeX: 129
  • EndNote: 131
Views and downloads (calculated since 12 Jun 2015)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 12 Jun 2015)

Cited

Latest update: 20 Jul 2024
Download
Short summary
The common use of "potential evaporation" to estimate actual evapotranspiration or to describe the suitability of a given climate for plant growth may lead to wrong conclusions about the consequences of climate change on plant growth and water relations. Wind speed in particular can have opposite effects on potential evaporation and transpiration from plant leaves. Therefore, we recommend to avoid using the concept of potential evaporation in relation to plants and transpiration from leaves.