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Proceedings of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences An open-access publication for refereed proceedings in hydrology
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Volume 379
Proc. IAHS, 379, 415–420, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/piahs-379-415-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Proc. IAHS, 379, 415–420, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/piahs-379-415-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Pre-conference publication 05 Jun 2018

Pre-conference publication | 05 Jun 2018

Socio-hydrological implications of water management in the dry zone of Sri Lanka

Isurun Upeksha Gamage1 and Hetti Arachchige Hemachandra Jayasena2 Isurun Upeksha Gamage and Hetti Arachchige Hemachandra Jayasena
  • 1Post Graduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya 20400, Sri Lanka
  • 2Department of Geology, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya 20400, Sri Lanka

Abstract. Water management plays a vital role in the agricultural economy and living conditions of people in Sri Lanka. Though government and non-government organizations have been readily contributing to water management, it is still inefficient, especially in terms of water allocation, consumption and conservation. To identify factors which could be used to implement integrated water resources management (IWRM), a socio-hydrological study was performed in five areas within the dry zone in Sri Lanka. The study covers a comprehensive analysis of how the household income, demography and education level correlating to water usage, purification and disposal methods. The average household income ranges from LKR 2500 to 15 000 per month. The results show that the average daily usage for drinking, cooking, washing, toiletries and bathing are 3, 5, 10, 7, and 85 L per person, respectively. Majority of the families use dug wells and pipe-borne water as the primary source. Correlation coefficients suggest that higher household income or level of education leads to increased water consumption (R  =  0.91, 0.94). There is no linear relationship between the level of education with the good practices of water purification and disposal. Though these results indicate preliminary assessments based on the dry zone practices, efficient water management could be enhanced by strong socio-hydrological implications through educating people on conservation, usage, disposal practices and health concerns.

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Our research examined the sustainability of rural societies based on water usage perspectives which are different from modern societies with pipe borne water. The average daily usage for drinking, cooking, washing, toiletries, and bathing are 3, 5, 10, 7, and 85 liters per person, respectively. Majority of the families use dug wells and pipe-borne water as the primary source. Correlation coefficients suggest that higher household income or level of education leads to increased water consumption.
Our research examined the sustainability of rural societies based on water usage perspectives...
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