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Proceedings of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences An open-access publication for refereed proceedings in hydrology
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Volume 371
Proc. IAHS, 371, 215–221, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/piahs-371-215-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Proc. IAHS, 371, 215–221, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/piahs-371-215-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  12 Jun 2015

12 Jun 2015

Water dynamics under changing land cover

J. Vaze, Y. Q. Zhang, and L. Zhang J. Vaze et al.
  • CSIRO Land and Water Flagship, GP.O. Box 1666, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia

Abstract. Most of the forested headwater catchments are an important source of water supply in many parts of the world. A prime example is southeast Australia where forests supply major river systems and towns and cities with water. It is critical for an informed and adaptive water resource management to understand changes in streamflow caused by vegetation changes in these headwater forest catchments. Natural disturbances such as bushfires and anthropogenic activities like forestation, deforestation, or logging alter vegetation, evapotranspiration and soil water status, and may affect water supplies. Although catchment water yield is mainly controlled by climatic conditions, but it is also strongly influenced by land cover changes because of natural disturbances and anthropogenic activities. It is necessary to accurately estimate streamflow in water supply catchments subjected to dramatic land surface changes. This paper summarises the methods commonly used to investigate the impacts of land cover change on water resources, and provides some examples of impacts of afforestation/deforestation and bushfire on water resources in two southeast Australian catchments.

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Most of the forested headwater catchments are an important source of water supply in many parts of the world. A prime example is southeast Australia where forests supply major river systems and towns and cities with water. It is critical for an informed and adaptive water resource management to understand changes in streamflow caused by vegetation changes in these headwater forest catchments. Natural disturbances such as bushfires and anthropogenic activities like forestation, deforestation, or
Most of the forested headwater catchments are an important source of water supply in many parts...
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