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Proceedings of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences An open-access publication for refereed proceedings in hydrology
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Volume 368
Proc. IAHS, 368, 460–465, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/piahs-368-460-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Proc. IAHS, 368, 460–465, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/piahs-368-460-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  07 May 2015

07 May 2015

Water budget and its variation in Hutuo River basin predicted with the VIP ecohydrological model

F. Huang1,2 and X. Mo1 F. Huang and X. Mo
  • 1Key Laboratory of Water Cycle & Related Land Surface Processes, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100101, China
  • 2University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049, China

Keywords: Streamflow, evapotranspiration, Hai River Basin, VIP model, climate change, human activities

Abstract. Accurate assessment of water budgets is important to water resources management and sustainable development in catchments. Here the VIP (Vegetation Interface Processes) ecohydrological model is used to estimate the water budget and its influence factors in Hutuo River basin, China. The model runs from 1956 to 2010 with a spatial resolution of 1 km, utilizing remotely sensed LAI data of MODIS. During the study period the canopy transpiration takes up 58% of evapotranspiration over the whole catchment and the fractions of soil and interception evaporation are 36% and 6% respectively. The annual evapotranspiration and streamflow are both declining, mainly resulting from the decrease of annual precipitation. Attribution analysis shows that the contributions of climate change and human activities to the decrease of streamflow are 48% and 52%, respectively.

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